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Sunday, December 7, 2014

Drumming Up More Work, Step 2

Last week I posted about my ongoing marketing blitz--just in time for the holidays. Step 1 is reaching out to current and past clients; step 2 is one that many freelancers overlook. It's following up on your outstanding pitches, LOIs, and other attempts to connect with new clients. 

A follow-up needn't be complicated or lengthy. Mine typically look something like: 

Dear Kathleen:

Hope your week is off to a great start. I'm writing to follow up on my pitch about how kettle bell training can help with weight loss; for your convenience, I've included it below. Would you let me know within two weeks if you're interested in the idea? If I don't hear from you by December 17, I'll assume you're not interested in it at this time, and may market it elsewhere. 

Thanks for your time, and I look forward to hearing from you soon!

Sincerely, 
Kelly James-Enger 

Typically a follow-up provokes a response, but if I don't hear anything within the deadline, I go ahead and pitch it to another market with no regrets. And if the editor says, "no thanks," I resub it in the same manner, and come up with a new idea that she may be able to use. 

Last week one of my follow-ups resulted in an assignment; three "we'll-be-in-touch" responses, and an "no thanks." That's not a bad track record from taking the time to follow up on outstanding queries. 

*** Want more advice about drumming up work as a freelancer? Check out my freelance classic, Six-Figure Freelancing: The Writer's Guide to Making More Money, Second Edition. If you're more interested in getting into ghostwriting and content marketing, I suggest Goodbye Byline, Hello Big Bucks: Make Money Ghostwriting Books, Articles, Blogs and More, Second EditionAnd if you're brand-new to freelancing, Dollars and Deadlines: Make Money Writing Articles for Print and Online Markets walks you through the process of launching your freelance career